Sample Courses

Outdoor Education Courses

Evans Lake Outdoor Education Courses

This past year we completely revamped our Outdoor Education program at Evans Lake. These programs contain complete lesson plans for the following areas: trees, water, soils, wildlife, skills, management, winter safety, migration and adaptation mapping, etc.  We have designed our program to fulfill provincial PLO’s and to assist in your lesson planning.

WATER

Follow the Water

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: follow the site’s water flow from it’s source to its destination, using the camp’s lake as an example; describe factors that affect water quality as it moves from place to place; describe inter-relationships between water, wildlife, trees, soil, and people in the camp’s watershed.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Looking at Lakes

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: describe plants and animals living in the lake and at another water location at camp, similarities and differences between sites; suggest possible food chains for each location.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

The Acid Test

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: explain at least two ways that water and soil are inter-connected, discuss how acid rain winds up in the water system, and suggest several ways of managing human activities for positive effects on water and soil.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Water, Water Everywhere

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: understand that a number of biotic factors can influence the quality of water and therefore have an influence on the habitat of aquatic organisms.

Reference: Exploring Forests

Bottle Biology

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: explore relationships between land and water systems.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Hooks and Ladders

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: become aware of the need to manage water wisely to ensure a clean abundant supply; describe how water is important to fish; suggest several ways of managing water for positive effects on fish, water, soil, and humans.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

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TREES

ID a Tree

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: identify at least two deciduous and two coniferous trees in the forest; identify at least four other plants or shrubs growing in the same habitat as the trees; speculate about the habitat’s ability to meet the needs of these trees and plants; speculate about the trees’ ability to contribute to the surrounding habitat.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Cookies and Cores

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: name the three major parts of a tree and the major functions of each; describe at least two methods of which foresters use in gathering information about the health and growth of trees.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Measure Up!

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: estimate the height of a tree using at least one simple method of measurement; describe and measure the circumference and diameter of a tree; tell how a forester might use such measurement in planning forest management activities.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Variations in a Forest

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to understand that: an ecosystem is an interaction between a community of plants and animals, and a set of biotic facts; soil is an important component of an ecosystem and has its own set of characteristics; ecosystems naturally change over time in a process called succession.

Reference: Exploring Forests

Printmaking from Nature

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: identify different types of plants and trees, create a record of plants and trees.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Maple Seed Mix-Up

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: discuss the different factors that help or hinder the growth of tree seeds.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Tree Factory

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: show the structure of a tree through dramatization.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Tree Survival Game

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: become familiar with the basic requirements for tree growth and survival.

Reference: Forest Education Programs

Forest Faces

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: investigate the forest looking for natural formations to enhance to look like an animal or person, etc.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Seeds to Snag

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: define the stages of the life of a tree; describe three limiting factors that could affect a tree; define the term ‘snag’ and give reasons why snags are useful.

Reference: Winter Programs

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SOILS

Soil Walk

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: identify soil components and soil types; describe soil layers and the function of each layer; identify vegetation covers associated with different soil types. Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities Underground Plumbing

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: see a relationship between water and different soil materials; discover the effect soil has on the water flow and water quality.

Reference: Forest Education Programs

Mud Pile Mountain

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: observe the effects of moving water on soil; observe management practices man may use to control soil erosion; describe how these management practices influence Trees, Wildlife, and Man in a positive manner.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

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WILDLIFE

Hungry, Hungry Marten

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: define the terms wild and domestic animals, carnivores, herbivores, omnivores, and endangered species; describe four basic needs of wildlife; describe how habitat affects animal survival; list several animals and describe their habitat needs.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Life in the Wild

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: define the term adaptation; suggest several forms of adaptation used by wildlife; describe several ways in which wildlife is interdependent on other forest components.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Oh Deer

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: define the term limiting fact; name several limiting factors and describe their effects on wildlife; describe at least one relationship between habitat change and wildlife population.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

They Think I’m Lunch

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: identify and describe three essential components of habitat; describe the importance of good habitats for animals; define limiting factors and give examples; recognize that some fluctuations in wildlife populations are natural as ecological systems undergo a constant change; recognize that changes in one animals habitat component may in turn have an effect on other animals.

Reference: Exploring Forests

Run, Young, Run!

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: understand that animals use various adaptive behaviors to survive and adult animals play a key role in keeping their young safe from predators.

Reference: Exploring Forests

Survival Game

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: understand that all animals play roles within a predator/prey food web, and use various adaptive behaviors to survive.

Reference: Exploring Forests

Quick Frozen Critters

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: understand that animals use various adaptive behaviors to obtain food and remain safe.

Reference: Exploring Forests

Cool It

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: describe the difference between cold and warm blooded animals; define the terms endotherms, and ectotherms; discover the wide range of temperatures in the forest.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Home Sweet Home

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: describe the differences between platform and cup-shaped nests; construct their own platform and/or cup-shaped nest; describe what kind of birds may use each of the nests.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

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LIFESTYLES

Papermaking

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: give a general brief description of how recycled paper is made; tell at least one way of recognizing a recycled paper item; discuss the impact of paper recycling on natural resources.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

How Do You Bury a Pile of Dirt

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: sort garbage into biodegradable, non-biodegradable and recyclable categories, list factors present in soil which aid in composting, describe the impact that recycling, reusing, and composting have on natural resources and on landfill sites.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Forests For Life

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: define the term habitat enhancement and provide several examples; describe how to examine an area with the suitable habitat for some form of life native to BC forests; describe and carry out at least one type of enhancement activity; explain how habitat enhancement is connected to resource management.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

 

We Can Do It!

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: identify a problem involving wildlife on camp grounds; suggest and evaluate alternative ways to solve or improve the problem; successfully undertake a project; analyze and describe the process required to solve the problem.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Popcorn Food Chain

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: understand how the energy flows from the sun through the plants to the animals in a field.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Deadly Links

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: describe possible consequences of pesticides entering the food chain.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

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MANAGEMENT

Gilligan’s Island

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: describe some of the positive and negative aspects of a group problem-solving task; suggest some positive and negative implications of resource use; suggest how planning is an important part of resource use and management.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Resources For Us All

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: recognize some of the many demands made upon the forest’s limited resources; suggest some ways of coping with different needs for forest resources; discuss some of the impacts of human activities on resource use and management.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Looking at an Ecosystem

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of interdependence within a mini-ecosystem by predicting possible results of change within that ecosystem.

Reference: Exploring Forests

How Can We Use a Forest

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: understand that several factors determine the value of a forested area, including a number of marketable trees, its ecological worth to the plants and animals that live there, its recreational worth for humans, and its aesthetic worth.

Reference: Exploring Forests

The Lorax

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: recognize the importance of managing our forests.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Instream Projects

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: identify a problem involving a stream on camp grounds; suggest and evaluate alternative ways to solve or improve the problem; successfully undertake a project; analyze and describe the process required to solve the problem.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Forest Consequences

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the effects of human and non-human activity in forested areas.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Planning for Resources

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: list eight natural resources; suggest some ways of controlling the use of conservation of resources in BC; discuss some of the impacts of human activities on resource use and management.

Reference: Forest Education Programs – Choice Activities

Forest Mapping and Measurement

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate how to use an increment bore and explain what it is used for; identify three coniferous and two deciduous trees; identify environmentally sensitive areas and discuss why they are sensitive; demonstrate skills used to make a site map of a forested area; list and describe three methods of logging; calculate the height of a tree.

Reference: Winter Programs

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SKILLS

Orienteering

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate the orienteering skills necessary to complete at least two of the camp compass course.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Canoeing

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate how to hold a paddle; use at least three different strokes; how to enter and exit a canoe; and how to change places in a canoe.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

Mission Impossible

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: incorporate canoeing, orienteering, and outdoor survival skills into an outdoor challenge activity; demonstrate some ways of applying basic skills in canoeing, orienteering, and outdoor survival to problem-solving tasks; suggest some ways of using teamwork and cooperation to help make decisions and solve problems.

Reference: Forest Education Programs Core Activities

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WINTER

Winter Safety I (Clothing)

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate how to avoid cold weather hazards.

Reference: Winter Programs

Winter Safety II (Hypothermia)

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate and recognize the warning signs of hypothermia, and four methods of heat loss.

Reference: Winter Programs

Winter Survival I (Shelter Building)

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: demonstrate how to build an emergency survival shelter to withstand the elements of a given situation; remember the five aspects of survival.

Reference: Winter Programs

 

Winter Survival II (Fire Building)

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: build a fire to boil water; demonstrate one method of melting snow into safe drinking water.

Reference: Winter Programs

Wildlife Appreciation I (Adaptation and Migration)

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: define the term ‘winter adaptation’ and list three animals and their methods of adapting; understand the seasonal change in diet of some animals; define the term ‘migration’ and list two animals that migrate through the area.

Reference: Winter Programs

Wildlife Appreciation II (Tracking and Animal Encounters)

Objectives: Students/campers will be able to: identify different types of animal tracks; demonstrate how to behave when confronted by a wild animal.

Reference: Winter Programs

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